Corpus Christi parishioners raised $6.22 million in pledges and direct donations to date for their Millwoods church.

WCR PHOTO | RAMON GONZALEZ

Corpus Christi parishioners raised $6.22 million in pledges and direct donations to date for their Millwoods church.

January 11, 2016
RAMON GONZALEZ
WESTERN CATHOLIC REPORTER

Corpus Christi parishioners will have to wait a bit longer to begin worshipping in their new home.

Their $16 million church at 2707-34 St. is almost completed, but still needs a few final touches, primarily in the main entrance and the sanctuary.

The church was originally expected to be ready for Christmas 2015. Now church officials say it will be ready by the end of January.

"God had other plans," said spokesperson Ingrid Dolder-Frigon. "We've waited for almost 11 years; we can wait a little longer to make sure everything is right."

Corpus Christi is the second parish in the Millwoods area. It was established in 2001 to serve the area east of 50th Street.

"Parishioners are waiting patiently," said Father Joseph Vadassery, the recently-appointed pastor. "They have waited for so long one more month won't be too much."

Corpus Christi has been administered from St. Theresa Church, 7508-29 Ave., since its inception.

BUILD COMMUNITY

In 2004, the new parish began offering Masses in the gyms of both Father Michael Troy and Holy Family schools.

Fr. Joseph Vadassery, Corpus Christi's pastor, said parishioners are waiting patiently for their church to open.

WCR PHOTO | RAMON GONZALEZ

Fr. Joseph Vadassery, Corpus Christi's pastor, said parishioners are waiting patiently for their church to open.

That was discontinued in 2011 when officials centralized church activities at Father Michael Troy School in order to build community.

Approximately 400 people attend the two Sunday Masses there.

Parishioners have raised more than $6.22 million in pledges and direct donations to date to pay for their new church - a modern 4,400-square-metre facility for 1,500 people. A gala fundraiser at the Shaw Conference Centre in October brought in an additional $130,000.

FAN-SHAPED

The church is fan-shaped, much like St. Charles, St. Theresa and Holy Trinity churches. A unique feature is the roofline and ceiling which have a traditional cruciform shape open to below.

The outside of the Blessed Sacrament chapel will have a lantern form that will be visible from 34th Street.

In addition to the liturgical elements, the new church also features a hall with a commercial kitchen to feed up to 250 people, office area, ample gathering space and an abundance of meeting rooms.

There is no basement because the water table is too high.