Nadia Eweida poses for a photograph Jan. 15 after winning a religious discrimination case at Europe’s human rights’ court.

CNS PHOTO | LUKE MACGREGOR, REUTERS

Nadia Eweida poses for a photograph Jan. 15 after winning a religious discrimination case at Europe’s human rights’ court.

January 28, 2013

The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that the British government violated the rights of an airline flight attendant by failing to protect her right to conscience and religion.

It found that Nadia Eweida, 60, a Coptic Christian, suffered discrimination when she was told by British Airways, her employer, to stop wearing a cross on her uniform.

The court decided there had been a violation of Articles 9 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which protect freedom of thought, conscience and religion and prohibit unjust discrimination.

It awrded Eweida $2,670 in compensation and a further $40,000 in costs.