Columns

From the category archives: Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

Profound grief brings us to our knees in pain

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

December 6, 2010

What can we say in the face of deep loss, inconsolable grief, or unrequited obsessions? As a graduate student in Louvain, I once posed that question to the renowned psychologist, Antoine Vergote: "When you lose a loved one, either through death or because that person dies to you in some other way, what can you do? What can you say to help someone in that situation?" more . . .

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Seasons of life challenge us to rise to greater maturity

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

November 29, 2010

As a young man, Nikos Kazantzakis, the famous Greek writer, contemplated becoming a monk and once spent a summer touring monasteries. Years later, writing on the experience, he recounts a marvellous conversation he had with an elderly monk, Father Makarios. more . . .

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Our hearts search for a confessor who lets us be transparent

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

November 22, 2010

Perhaps more than anything else we are unconsciously seeking a confessor, someone before whom we can open our hearts, be completely transparent, pour out our confusion and freely admit our sins. Inside our search for a soulmate is the search for a confessor. more . . .

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We kill first with a thought, then a word, then a gun

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

November 8, 2010

In the early pages of the Bible, we are given a series of stories that describe the human condition and give reasons why things are as they are. We are most familiar with the story of Adam and Eve, eating the forbidden fruit, the one we call the “original sin” story. more . . .

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Run with the crowd and you stumble over your own ethics

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

November 1, 2010

In the Gospels the word "crowd" is nearly always used pejoratively, so much so that nearly every time the word is used you could preface it with the adjective "mindless." more . . .

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Plagued by doubts? Sit in silent prayer for 30 minutes daily

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

October 25, 2010

Several years ago, a friend shared this story with me: Raised a Roman Catholic and essentially faithful in going to church and in trying to live an honest moral life, he found himself, in his mid-forties, plagued by doubts, unable to pray and unable (when he was honest with himself) to even believe in the existence of God. more . . .

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Believe God plays favourites? It's time to look in the mirror

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

October 18, 2010

Does God love some people more than others? Does God have favourites?

This is an old, disputed question with centuries of history: Is there a chosen race? Are some people predestined for heaven or hell? Does God love the poor more than the rich? Does God love sinners more than the righteous? Does God love virgins more than married persons? more . . .

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Great writers can stretch perceptions, but read with care

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

October 11, 2010

British writer, A.S. Byatt, is perhaps the foremost novelist in the English language today. She will, no doubt, one day be awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.

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Suicide’s crippling shadow spills over friends, family

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

August 30, 2010

Every year I write a column on suicide. It’s not my favourite thing to do, but I do it because there is too little in the public forum, secular or religious, on this painful issue. Suicide remains one of the great unmentionables and people who lose loved ones to suicide search mostly in vain for anything that might bring understanding and consolation.

 

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Ritual can be boring, but it will sustain our relationships

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

July 26, 2010

Never travel with anyone who expects you to be interesting all the time. On a long trip there are bound to be some boring stretches.

That’s an axiom offered by Daniel Berrigan in his Commandments for the Long Haul and it contains a wisdom that is often absent today in our marriages, our family lives, our friendships, our churches and our spiritual lives.

 

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