Columns

From the category archives: Maria Kozakiewicz

Maria Kozakiewicz

Guests should accept the king's invitation

Maria Kozakiewicz

October 6, 2014
28th Sunday in Ordinary Time
October 19, 2014

He (the king) dispatched his servants to summon the invited guests to the feast, but they refused to come." The guests should come to the feast. The ancient world was not as well fed as we are, at least those who live in the West today. Every five years or so, people starved, due to drought, excessive rain or war. Even at the best of times, daily meals were simple. Often months would pass with little or no meat on the table. That is why a feast became the universal symbol of heavenly delights. The wedding feast, of all feasts, was supreme.

Read the rest of entry »

The cross brings life amidst our turmoil

Maria Kozakiewicz

September 8, 2014
Triumph of the Cross
September 14, 2014

The story of the bronze serpent made by Moses and mounted on the pole has its own sequence of events. The tragedy begins, as always, in growing forgetfulness of God and lack of gratitude. As life in the desert gets tougher, the thoughts of the wanderers shift from God's past miracles and focus on present dissatisfaction, the meagre food and the absence of the lush greenery of Egypt's delta.

Read the rest of entry »

Solomon sought wisdom of the heart

Maria Kozakiewicz

July 21, 2014
Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
July 27, 2014

It took me a while to understand that the Mass readings should be read and meditated on in their entirety, not a la carte. If we read the texts in the order presented, we are offered a chance to walk the way of faith from the beginning – from the childhood of Old Testament to adulthood of the New. Thus, the holy texts, which this Sunday refer to the rise of the kingdom of God, begin with Solomon's plea for wisdom which is presented as the ability to distinguish right from wrong.

Read the rest of entry »

Peter overcame revulsion to pagan Rome

Maria Kozakiewicz

June 23, 2014
Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul
June 29, 2014

When you walk the Via Appia, hoping not to twist an ankle on the large, flat stones of this ancient road, it is hard not to think about St. Peter. His sandals must have trod the same stones, his eyes seen the same or similar sights. Both sides of this ancient road were lined with tombs at that time, the more ancient ones closer to the city gates. The huge cylindrical mausoleum of the wealthy aristocratic woman Caecilla Metella must have still gleamed with marble decorations, reliefs of once-sacrificed bulls' heads, and heavy swags of fruit and leaves.

Read the rest of entry »

Rome offers reminders of deepest truths

Maria Kozakiewicz

May 26, 2014
Ascension of the Lord
June 1, 2014

Rome in May smells of roses, flowering vines and jasmine. Roof and balcony gardens overflow with greenery. Oranges shine through thick, dark leaves of trees. Streets of this huge, ancient city resound with noise that dies gradually well past midnight and for two hours only. Rome of the 21st century is constantly on the go, very much like New York, Toronto or any other leading metropolis. What differentiates it, however, from the secular, fast-paced world elsewhere is the visible and tangible presence of Christian faith. Even an atheist cannot avoid this experience. Faith is present in the tolling of 600 church bells every Sunday morning, the habits of nuns and brothers on streets, small shrines of Mary on walls of buildings.

Read the rest of entry »

Hope found in the Word, breaking of Bread

Maria Kozakiewicz

April 28, 2014
Third Sunday of Easter
May 4, 2014

Two disciples of Jesus walk away from Jerusalem, sad and disappointed. Their hopes of rebirth of the great kingdom of Israel have been dashed. The great prophet, "mighty in deed and word before God and all the people," has been killed. Jesus walks beside the disciples unrecognized and, at first, just listens to their words, their selfish complaints. They do not pity the Crucified, they pity themselves. "But we were hoping that he would be the one to redeem Israel." They are egocentric, like all of us.

Read the rest of entry »

In time of suffering, trust in the Lord

Maria Kozakiewicz

March 31, 2014
Fifth Sunday of Lent
April 6, 2014

What were Mary's and Martha's thoughts during Lazarus' illness and dying? Those who have nursed a loved one during such time may know. On one side, there is the growing realization that the dreaded moment creeps closer and closer. On the other side, nursed by shreds of prayer and stories of miracles, there is childlike hope. Maybe, maybe, God will hear our pleas and those eyes that are closing will open, healthy and joyful. All will be well again. Maybe.

Read the rest of entry »

Love of Confession must be developed early

Maria Kozakiewicz

March 3, 2014
First Sunday of Lent
March 9, 2014

I love Lent. All liturgical periods in the Church are full of wisdom, love and the beauty of God, but Lent, followed by Easter, is the summit of them all. It is the supreme homecoming for us, with the door thrown open to all by the Father. As migrant birds return to safety of familiar lakes and forests, we return to Jesus through the sacrament of Reconciliation. We become whole again.

Read the rest of entry »

Salt of the earth should never lose its taste

Maria Kozakiewicz

February 3, 2014
Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
February 9, 2014

Salt is a peculiar type of seasoning. It is invisible when dissolved yet essential for taste. We miss it even if we cannot see it.

Read the rest of entry »

Christmas is season for public display of Christian faith

Maria Kozakiewicz

December 2, 2013
Second Sunday in Advent
December 9, 2013

It is freezing today. Thick snow covers our backyard, and in the hazy darkness of the morning I can see sparrows flock to the birdfeeder. I have to get up an hour earlier because of the icy roads.

Read the rest of entry »

Pages: Prev12345NextReturn Top